Kā izvairīties no telpaugu pārliešanas?

How to avoid over watering plants?

How to avoid over watering plants?

Quite often I receive questions from you about how often to water a plant or what is the watering schedule for plants. Then let's talk about watering plants.

🌿The first and most important thing is to remember that watering plants does not mean that you have poured too much water on the plant, but rather that you water the plant too often and do not allow the soil to dry out between waterings. This is also one of the reasons why plants can start to rot. That's why we always check whether the ground is dry before watering the plant.

❌ We are not guided by the appearance of the surface of the earth because it is false!!
‼️Before watering the plant, always check with a finger or a wooden stick that the soil is really dry.

The roots of the plant are deep in the flower pot, and that is why the moisture level of the soil must be checked before pouring. The top layer of the earth dries out much faster, but deep down the earth is still wet for a long time.

🌿Secondly, remember to always pour warm water over the plants. Watering plants with cold water can damage the roots, and the roots of the plant can go into a dormant period and not accept food and water!

🌿Thirdly, remember that there is no such common casting schedule for all people! We all have our own growing conditions at home - light, heat, air humidity, plant size, flower pot size, etc. These growing conditions are also the reason why the frequency of watering the plant differs from person to person.

🌿Fourth, remember to be especially careful with watering plants in winter. It is easiest to water the plants at this time, because there is little sunlight, the rooms are cooler than in the summer, and the plants do not absorb as much water as in the summer. Therefore, it is important to remember that plants should be watered less often in winter than in summer.

I myself have had to water my alocasias in the winter and then have to reanimate them. 🤦‍♀️
Back to blog

Younger plants

1 of 4
1 of 3